The Clearing Party Manifesto - Economic Policy

The Clearing Party Manifesto – Economic Policy

A specter haunts the political personnel in office: the specter of degagism. The silent threat that whatever they have done or said during their term of office will ultimately result in a scathing disavowal at the ballot box.

Because the clearing vote is to electoral behavior what the upheaval is to the board game: it does not consist in taking your ballot to elect someone, but to knock out the elected officials in place. Whatever their political label and with any bulletin. The clearing party is a party without a label: what matters to it is to change the poster.

Because the clearing vote is to electoral behavior what the upheaval is to the board game: it does not consist in taking your ballot to elect someone, but to knock out the elected officials in place. Whatever their political label and with any bulletin. The clearing party is a party without a label: what matters to it is to change the poster. The ballot only has transactional value. As political scientists point out, voting is rarely worth full and complete adherence to the ballot chosen: it is the expression of a strategy, of a game of three-cushion billiards, of a sometimes indecipherable equation. As it often proceeds more by elimination than by membership. Is it due to the particular period that we are going through with the emergence of what is now called “the strategist voter”? Not sure that the phenomenon is so new as that. Take the French presidential election. Since the start of the Fifth Republic in 1958, only two sitting presidents standing for re-election have been re-elected: François Mitterrand and Jacques Chirac. But if both were spared by the clearing phenomenon – unlike Valéry Giscard d’Estaing beaten in 1981 by François Mitterrand and Nicolas Sarkozy in 2012 by François Hollande for their re-election -, it is thanks to the exceptional configuration of the cohabitation . In fact, it was their respective Prime Ministers, who appeared before them, who suffered the wrath of degagism, serving as a sort of lightning rod for them. In 2017, François Hollande preferred to throw in the towel by retiring from competition, ahead of the ax of clearance. Therefore, how not to wonder if any elected official who emerges crowned with victory is not so by default? This could explain, moreover, why women and men politicians are so anxious to represent themselves even when they are in bad shape. Being re-elected is perhaps the only way to convince yourself that you have “really” been elected for yourself. Be that as it may, degagism tells of our relationship as voters to the political class. He records his disqualification. It can be via the populist side as the expression of “all rotten”: the idea that women or men politicians would be the same regardless of their political side, so that the vote would only serve to replace them as interchangeable tokens, without illusion, until the next ballot. It can also be in a pseudo-progressive vision which advocates replacement by people outside the political arena, by novices or people from the private sector. Which amounts to admitting that politicians would only be good if they are not politicians. This is the myth of “civil society” where it would suffice to change people for everything to change. But when will an elected representative from civil society in turn become a politician who will also have to be replaced? The problem, as we can clearly see with this clearance game, is that those who benefit from it are also bound to suffer from it sooner or later. It’s endless. In any case, as long as the game is still possible. Because, by definition, it is impossible to play it in authoritarian regimes. It’s a luxury you can afford in a democracy. But if the latter one day bears the brunt of the degagism, and it is the degagism itself that will be released.

.

Comments

0 comments

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.